Thank you to those who joined us this morning for our Make (Good) Trouble Facebook Live Q&A about the impending return to school/college/uni. Make (Good) Trouble founder, Daisy Cresswell was joined by Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust sleep expert, Lara Rutherford and YMCA e-wellbeing‘s Nicola Harvey to discuss the why’s and wherefores of face masks, social distancing and ever-changing guidance.

Back to School Q&A

Back to School Q&A hosted by Daisy Cresswell with guests Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust sleep expert, Lara Rutherford and YMCA e-wellbeing's Nicola Harvey

Posted by Make Good Trouble on Thursday, 27 August 2020

Daisy, Nicola and Lara discussed the understandable anxiety of students and parents facing a return to education, and offered plenty of advice about where to get help, talking to your employer about flexible working arrangements and how to get back into a routine once term starts.

Resources

www.e-wellbeing.co.uk/schools offers lots of resources and tips for parents/teachers and young people to support the transition back to school. This includes videos of young people talking about their mental health, Covid-19 resources, tools that help to challenge anxious thoughts and content on ways to redevelop social skills.

Search the e-wellbeing services for young people and find a mental health support service in Brighton & Hove, East Sussex and West Sussex.

 Parents can access the Parent Talk Team on Action for Children –  a chatroom and platform specifically for parents during this unprecedent time.

ChatHealth text service, (open 9-4.30) run by the Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust. 11-19 year old and parents of school-aged children can text 07480 635423.

School Nurse duty number (9-5 every day) 01273 696011 ext 1692

You can also join our Facebook Group, Raising Teens in Lockdown, for further support from parents, teachers and mental health specialists.

Congratulations to Brighton & Hove Year 11 students receiving GCSE results today. We’ve teamed up with Storythings to make this film especially for Year 11s. It features a new poem, ‘Extraordinary’ by Brighton Festival guest director Lemn Sissay MBE, together with messages from your schools.

This film was made by Storythings and Make (Good) Trouble with support from Brighton Dome & Brighton Festival and Brighton & Hove Music & Arts. Thanks to everyone who contributed.

Results Day Live Q&A

If you have questions about next steps for students moving on to college, whether to take exams in September or going back into education after lockdown, we’re hosting a live Q&A with educational specialist Jo Heywood on Facebook tonight (Thursday 20th) at 7pm. Do join us there and let us know if you have any questions for the Live event in advance by posting a comment here or on our Facebook page. See you there!

Make (Good) Trouble teen reporter, Lola Ray, spoke to Anne Longfield, the Children’s Commissioner for England, and asked her about her work as “the eyes and ears of kids in the system” during her six year term and her hopes for the future for young people. They discussed lockdown and how it’s affecting teens, parents and teachers.

Longfield says that her main focus in her six years as Children’s Commissioner for England, has been to “shine a light on those vulnerable kids. I really felt that they were so overlooked. Often invisible, if you like, to the services. They’re the children who fell through the gaps, got excluded from school, were in secure accommodation, the ones that were in secure accommodation. And in a way, the system couldn’t cope with the kids, rather that the kids couldn’t cope with the system.”

She calls for the government to look at these children’s situations, find these children and give them the support they need. She calls for there to be a vulnerable children and family recovery programme.

With school exclusions on the rise, Anne Longfield argues that schools should have a positive inclusion policy, whereby children that are excluded are helped to get back to their school as soon as possible. “I want them to be looking at when children need support and really providing that. If there is an exclusion, I want that to be a trigger… But if there is a reason why that child can’t continue in mainstream education… then I want them to get the best support they can… Alternative provision costs about six times as much as school per pupil. So we should expect it to be fantastic. We should expect it to be the best therapist, the best personal tutoring – all of those things to give to those kids who are having a tough time in school, the boost they need to get them back.”

Asked what she would do if she could make just one change to help young people, Longfield said: “I would like young people, and kids generally, to have their place at the top table, that they’re actually part of the decision-making and that there is a recognition that kids are 20 percent of our population but they’re 100 percent of our future. And if we fail kids, what does that mean for society in the future? Whether you think about it in terms of young people themselves, or indeed of all of us, we’re all going to benefit if we can give kids the opportunities they need and the springboard into adult life.”

Find out more about the work of the Children’s Commissioner for England.
Follow @ChildrensComm on Twitter
Follow @childrenscommissionersoffice on Facebook

In our second episode of Raising Teens, we’re looking at home schooling and education in lockdown. With lockdown set to continue for most young people, we explore what is life like for families and teens who have had exams cancelled and aren’t sure what happens next. We look at what support is available for students who have limited access to technology – 700,000 children don’t have a laptop or tablet of their own and 60,000 don’t have access to broadband in the UK. Some have no quiet space at home to work in. And when schools do re-open more fully, how comfortable are parents with sending their children back there?

Our guests, speaking to host, Guy Lloyd, are Rose Scott, counsellor at Hove Park school, Dr Kerstyn Comley, founder of the MeeTwo app and Matt Dumbledon, a father and part of the team at Dad La Soul, a grassroots community to support dads.

Teen reporter, Lola Ray, spoke to teens about how they were getting on with studying from home, how much time they spent on their school work and how they think the pandemic and lockdown might affect their future.

Dr Kerstyn Comley talks about anxiety on Raising Teens

You can hear Raising Teens on BBC Radio Sussex and Surrey at 7.30pm on Mondays and Wednesdays and online on BBC Sounds.

🔊 Listen to Lockdown Home Schooling on BBC Sounds

🔊 Listen to last week’s show on Anxiety in a Pandemic on BBC Sounds

Help and advice

NSPCC support and advice for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) 

Place 2 Be information on schools and education during the pandemic 

NHS mental health support for young people 

Young Minds advice and tips for young people who are self isolating

MeeTwo is a free fully moderated app for young people, providing peer support, expert help, educational and creative resources as well as links to UK charities and helplines.

The Student Room, coronavirus-related advice and support for students

Kooth, an online mental wellbeing community